Tuesday, January 15, 2008

I Have Always Wondered How This Process Works....

So.... The Museum of Arts & Design has a terrific PR person, who sends us almost daily PDFs and references to reviews of the current exhibition we are participating in. Today I received a very lengthy pdf of a piece that was published on a members-only trade website. The company that published this huge grab page on its site is described as "the leading global service providing online research, trend analysis and news to the fashion, design and style industries. XXXX is based in London and has offices in New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, Los Angeles, Melbourne and Tokyo."

The eight page pdf was composed mostly of extreme detail images of the artworks in "Pricked"... "a great exhibition for directional ideas". The dozens of close-up images were taken out of the meaningful context in which they were created, but showed some cool "effects" that you will soon be seeing on designer clothes and home textiles in a store near you. The closing comments on the image bank of our work reads, "The 'Pricked' exhibition offers endless inspiration for textile and surface design (emphasis theirs), particularly in relation to our womenswear trend directions for autumn/winter 2008/09 - Disturbed, Elusive and New Frontiers."

I am happy to send a copy of the pdf to anyone who emails me.


4 Comments:

Blogger Sigrid said...

Sorry, I have to comment yet again. Design and fashion is art converted for consumption. Sometimes I feel like such a consumer even taking photos of nature, or looking at art.

9:12 PM  
Blogger Kate said...

I guess I was shocked to learn that that there are large companies that exist to distill our intellectual property and prepare it as fodder for other companies who will make tons of money off of the ideas, while some of these artists might not even sell their original piece. A person who wanted to copy a design or technique used to have to physically go to the exhibition: they don't even have to do that any more.

I find it a bit disconcerting that if the show travels, for example, people in Berlin might have already seen a designer dress with embroidered stains like Nava Lubelski's before they get to see the actual work in exhibition.

Often these days, I can follow a Google link to a place where my work or an image of mine is mentioned, but it is a closed, members-only site, so I cannot even see how my copyrighted image is being used. I am getting too busy to concern myself with this stuff, but it still ruffles my feathers when I think about these issues terms of artists' rights.

Thanks for visiting, and for your comments, Sigrid.

10:49 PM  
OpenID sarahpetruz said...

"Often these days, I can follow a Google link to a place where my work or an image of mine is mentioned, but it is a closed, members-only site, so I cannot even see how my copyrighted image is being used."

Since these images are under copyright, is it appropriate to ask a members-only site to show you the context in which your work is being used? If the image is reaching a substantial number of people (and it is not non-profit educational use) I could see this as a concern.

And in a case such as this are you technically providing an "illustration" without being compensated for use?

11:43 PM  
Blogger Kate said...

I would say "yes" and "yes" Sarah.... We need an artist with a copyright lawyer for a spouse to get pissed off enough to create a landmark case. Jeff Koons was sued and lost many years back, but apparently it set no precedents....

11:04 PM  

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